Mapping the New Economy: Social Enterprise!

Mapping the New Economy: Social Enterprise
by Chuck Lynd

Social Enterprise graphic = people planet profit

Social enterprise, sometimes called social entrepreneurship, is arguably the most significant component of the emerging New Economy. A major criticism of the current economy is its focus on maximizing profit, often at the expense of investing in employees and with little regard for environmental impacts. While many responsible businesses do invest in their employees and actively promote sustainable practices, social enterprises incorporate doing good into their DNA.
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Mapping the New Economy: Background and Overview

 

Paul-Hawken-blessed-unrest-pic+book-cover

Paul Hawken, author of Blessed Unrest

Mapping the New Economy
by Chuck Lynd

It’s a fascinating, unpredictable, chaotic, and confusing time to be alive. On the surface, it seems we have made quite a mess of things. You know the litany of problems: income inequality, climate change, intractable wars, and a global economy that seems to work for the few, not the many. We humans are the most disruptive species ever, but our creativity and innovation are working below the surface chaos. We’re busy making the changes necessary for a successful transition to a new economy – one that is less focused on profit for its own sake, more local, sustainable, and accountable to community needs..

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MMT Economics Offers Key to Funding New Economy and Green, Progressive Agenda

MMT Economics Offers Key to Funding New Economy and Green, Progressive Agenda
by Chuck Lynd

New Economic Perspectives logo

Do you see the goldfish swimming upstream in the logo above? That’s MMT, or Modern Monetary Theory.  They are the Young Turks advocating a new (sort of) approach to macroeconomics. They are knocking on the doors of academics and policy makers who are guarding the economic gates of a system that is failing us and in serious need of fiscal repair. Swimming upstream can be tiring and frustrating. We must remember Gandhi’s wise counsel.

First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win. ~ Gandhi (who won India from the British empire)

ghandi

Gandhi’s dictum sums up the process of social change, whatever the cause.  The great majority of people, in the US and around the globe, have suffered under the established neoclassical approach to economics for decades. The good news is that a new approach is in the wings, challenging the status quo in academia and in government policy as well.

The arrival of this new approach comes at a most propitious moment. Public awareness that economic globalization is the root cause of multiple social problems has entered the mainstream through the US presidential campaigns of Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders and Britain’s vote to leave the European Union. The promise of “free trade” of goods and services to support a worldwide consumer society has turned sour. Ordinary people, the 99% as we now say, are waking up to the downside of Read more →

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For a Better Columbus: Buy Local and Be Sustainable

Buy Local and Be Sustainable

One of the easiest ways to promote sustainability in your community is to buy local. When you support sustainable and local businesses you are also promoting workers’ rights, healthy eating, the environment, and family farms. With contributions from Chuck Lynd of Think Columbus First, this article connects the dots between sustainability and locally based businesses. Thanks to Katina Hazimhalis for writing the article and for collaborating with Think Columbus First.  Read the full article HERE!

 

 

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We Must Re-Localize our Economy

 The following letter, written by Chuck Lynd, was published in the Delaware Gazette. Read the full article there.

To the editor:

I respond to letters published in The Gazette on Monday, Jan. 18, from Sherrod Brown (“TPP puts Ohio auto jobs at risk”) and the letters about the closing of Buehler’s grocery store from the staff and from Jeff Ruhl.

Jeff Ruhl commented, “We could never understand how city planners could approve a Kroger store so close to Buehler’s and not have a devastating effect.” Ruhl also observed that downtown Delaware was once full of locally owned stores, but then Wal-Mart came to town and “our family stores started to disappear.”

Read the full article in the Delaware Gazette.

 

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Decentralization – Embracing Community by Steve Ponton

Decentralization and LocalizationSource: Decentralization – Embracing Community by Steve Ponton

Shop Local Eat Local Support Local graphic Steve Ponton joined Simply Living last year and a couple of months ago he mailed this well thought out reflection on the implications of the trend toward decentralization and a new focus on strengthening our local communities. It was too long for a newsletter article but we decided to share the entire 9-page essay because Steve hits on so many themes that are central to SOLE Coalition’s mission to support economic localization to strengthen our communities.  He organizes the paper in several sections to address Current Trends; the Green Economy; potential Roadblocks (especially Globalization); the Big Five Current Issues (stagnant economic conditions, climate change, energy, security/wars, and income inequality) and he ends with some thoughts about “Growth and Globalization.”  You can also download the attached PDF version of the essay.
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If I Put it in the Curbside Bin, It Must Be Recyclable by Pam Patsch | Simply Living

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Picture of Pam Patsch

This is the full article on recycling written by Pam Patsch. A shorter version appeared in the August 2014 Simply News. This engaging article includes a Recycling Quiz to test your knowledge about items than can and cannot be recycled in Columbus. Then Pam also includes a list of items that Rumpke will accept as well as those that cannot be recycled (yet).  Pam is not satisfied with the list of items that the city will not accept, so she lists resources that can take hard to recycle items like styrofoam, prescription meds, plastic plant containers, stuffed animals, and more.

Source: If I Put it in the Curbside Bin, It Must Be Recyclable by Pam Patsch | Simply Living

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If I Put it in the Curbside Bin, It Must Be Recyclable by Pam Patsch | Simply Living

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Picture of Pam Patsch

Source: If I Put it in the Curbside Bin, It Must Be Recyclable by Pam Patsch | Simply Living

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Buying In to Buying Local

Posted on by in Featured, Food with 0 Comments

Buying local is all the rage, but it means different things to different people. Learn what being a locavore means to the economy, the environment, your health, and your community to find out where you fall on the go-local scale.

Sometimes trends become so popular so fast that we don’t have time to figure out what they actually mean and if they’re a good idea. Buying local is the perfect example. It’s so roll-off-the-tongue catchy that it’s become synonymous with supporting the economy, environment, and community. And if you’re talking about food, it sounds healthy, too. But just what does it really mean?

Local

“Belonging or relating to a particular area or neighborhood, typically exclusively so”
—Google

Definitely vague. What’s a “particular area?” Is it a district? A city? How big a city? What about a province or state? What about a country or even a continent? Read more →

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O-H-I-Grow! Summit on Urban Ag & Community Gardening | Simply Living

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Sustainable Clintonville member Jodi Kushins and her family and friends operate “Over the Fence,” an urban farm in Columbus.  Over the Fence is dedicated to experimenting with, mastering, and sharing techniques for growing food that promote self-reliance and sustainability, and support our consumption of more fresh and locally harvested food.  Toward these ends, our farm serves as a demonstration site for season extension practices, vertical gardening, and permaculture design.

Source: O-H-I-Grow! Summit on Urban Ag & Community Gardening | Simply Living

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Support Our Local Economy CoalitionThink Columbus First is an initiative of: the Support Our Local Economy (SOLE) Coalition

Join and Save on local businesses in your neighborhood. >>
Order your SBB Card.

Reasons To Love Your Local Small Businesses:
  1. Supportive communities attract entrepreneurs who create local jobs
  2. They hire local people who know you & your unique needs
  3. They help give our communities personality and fun
  4. A 10% Shift from chain to local will create 5000 new jobs in Franklin County

Think Local

  • Consider adding more efficiency to your home or business. Visit Wattworks for indoor and outdoor LED lighting, IR heaters, solar power systems and more.
  • City Folks Farm Shop urban homesteading supplies in Columbus Central Ohio homesteaders and urban farmers can find supplies, classes and resources.
  • Shopping at Easton Town Center can be a local experience, when you visit Celebrate Local. The store features handmade and artisanal products from all over Ohio.

Where did you spend your $2 bill?

spend me local Have you seen one of our $2 bills? Did you get it as change from a local merchant? If so, pass it on to a friend or spend it at local independent business. Spread the word, contact us to get some $2 bills.

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